Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of humans through various comparative and holistic approaches that include past and present populations. The four fields of anthropology include biological, cultural, linguistics and archaeology. Each of these fields studies different and overlapping aspects of what it means to be human.

  1. Biological anthropology explores this question focusing mainly on biological traits such as physical features, genes, and DNA and how these interact with our environment. This includes the study of evolution and fossils along with contemporary human traits.
  2. Archaeological anthropology studies cultural change over time through the examination of material culture including architecture, human remains and other artifacts.
  3. Linguistic anthropology investigates verbal and non-verbal communication in humans and non-human primates in order to understand how language has developed in human groups both historically and physically, along with how it continues to change in modern populations. The connection between language and culture is also explored to understand how various variables such as gender, class and race/ethnicity affect language.
  4. Cultural anthropology analyzes contemporary people’s behaviors and beliefs/ideas to understand human diversity and the similarities that we all share. Using a cross-cultural approach, this subfield compares and contrasts various cultural components such as economics, politics, religion, gender and race/ethnicity to better understand what people do and why they do what they do in a variety of cultural settings. The goal is to increase our understanding of the human experience.

Students may earn an associate degree for transfer in anthropology. Anthropology courses also satisfy general education requirements for an associate degree in social sciences, and lower division transfer. Courses in anthropology include introductory courses in cultural anthropology, linguistics, archaeology and biological anthropology. Additionally, there are courses on the Anthropology of Religion, Magic and Witchcraft, and Sex and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspectives. The Honors Program includes two anthropology courses: ANTH 210H Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - Honors and ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural Perspective - Honors.

Faculty

NameOffice Room NumberPhoneEmail
Miller-Thayer, Jennifer CI 247626-852-8086jmillerthayer@citruscollege.edu

Contact Information

Division
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Dean
Dr. Dana Hester
Administrative Secretary
Gayle Allen
Division Office
CI 120
Division Phone Number
626-914-8860

This discipline prepares students to do the following:

  • Demonstrate analytical and critical analysis skills using college level vocabulary and writing skills as demonstrated through written responses in essays, research papers, or exams for the purposes of successfully navigating a transferable level course.
  • Analyze a variety of behavioral science research designs by participating in class discussions, group exercises, essays and exams to develop critical analysis skills needed for transfer level coursework.
  • Explore anthropological concepts such as language, culture, human use of material items, and humans from a biological construct by participating in class discussions, group work, essays, and exams to benefit from seeing the world through an anthropological culturally relative viewpoint.

ANTH 210
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3 Units (AA/AS; Citrus D2; CSU; UC; IGETC 4A; CSUGE D1; CSUGE D5)
54 lecture hours
Equivalent to: ANTH 210H

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ENGL 101.

Students will critically examine various societies around the world using basic cultural concepts such as language, gender, food production, economics, kinship, politics and religion. The class is designed to foster an appreciation of the diversity present in the world, teach introductory anthropological concepts, and strengthen critical thinking skills. College level reading is strongly advised for success in the course.

ANTH 210H
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - Honors
3 Units (AA/AS; Citrus D2; CSU; UC; IGETC 4A; CSUGE D1)
54 lecture hours
Equivalent to: ANTH 210

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Prerequisite(s): Student must be eligible for the Citrus College Honors Program or obtain a recommendation from an Honors instructor.

Strongly recommended: ENGL 101.

Students will critically examine various societies around the world using basic cultural concepts such as language, gender, food production, economics, kinship, politics and religion. The class is designed to foster an appreciation of the diversity present in the world, teach introductory anthropological concepts, and promote contextualized learning through projects applying anthropological knowledge and skills to solving human problems. Students are expected to work and participate at an honors level which includes strong critical thinking skills, thorough analysis of anthropological readings, presentation and leadership skills demonstrated through class participation/presentation, and service learning in the community. College level reading is strongly advised for success in the course.

ANTH 212
Introduction to Physical Anthropology
3 Units (AA/AS; Citrus B1; CSU; UC; IGETC 5B; CSUGE B2; CSUGE D1)
54 lecture hours

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ENGL 101.

An introductory study of the biological origin of humans. The course will emphasize the biology of humans, human evolution, primate evolution, taxonomy, pre-human fossil identification and adaption to the environment. CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT WITH ANTH 212L IS REQUIRED TO RECEIVE LAB SCIENCE CREDIT. College level reading is highly recommended for success in the course.

ANTH 212L
Introduction to Physical Anthropology Lab
1 Unit (AA/AS; Citrus B3; CSU; UC; IGETC 5C; CSUGE B3)
54 lab hours

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ENGL 101.

Co-Requisite(s): ANTH 212.

This course is the lab component for Introduction to Physical Anthropology 212. In the lab, students will have an expanded opportunity to work with anatomy, skeletal identification, taxonomy, and evolutionary trends. Concurrent enrollment with ANTH 212 is required. College level reading is highly recommended for success in the course.

ANTH 216
Sex and Gender in Cross Cultural Perspectives
3 Units (AA/AS; Citrus D2; CSU; UC; IGETC 4A; IGETC 4D; IGETC 4J; CSUGE D0; CSUGE D1; CSUGE D4)
54 lecture hours
Equivalent to: ANTH 216H, SOC 216

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ANTH 210 or ANTH 210H or SOC 201 or SOC 201H and ENGL 101.

This course explores different cultural attitudes, beliefs, ideas and expressions of sex and gender. Theories behind the formation of gender will also be explored. Both anthropological and sociological terms and concepts will be utilized for a cross disciplinary approach. This is primarily a seminar style course; college level reading and participation is necessary for successful completion.

ANTH 216H
Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural Perspective - Honors
3 Units (AA/AS; Citrus D2; CSU; UC; IGETC 4; CSUGE D)
54 lecture hours
Equivalent to: ANTH 216, SOC 216

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Prerequisite(s): Student must be eligible for the Citrus College Honors Program or obtain a recommendation from an Honors instructor.

Strongly recommended: ANTH 210 or ANTH 210H or SOC 201 or SOC 201H; ENGL 101.

This course explores different cultural attitudes, beliefs, ideas and expressions of sex and gender. Theories behind the formation of gender will also be explored. Both anthropological and sociological terms and concepts will be utilized for a cross disciplinary approach. Students are expected to work and participate at an honors level which includes strong critical thinking skills, thorough analysis of readings, presentations, and leadership skills demonstrated through class participation/presentation. College level reading is strongly advised for success in the course. This is primarily a seminar style course; college level reading and participation is necessary for successful completion.

ANTH 220
Introduction to Archaeology
3 Units (AA/AS; Citrus D2; CSU; UC; IGETC 4A; CSUGE D1)
54 lecture hours

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ENGL 101.

An introductory study of the science of archaeology. The course will emphasize the evolution of human material culture, the laws and theories governing the science of archaeology, archaeological processes, and the realities of archaeology versus popular culture definitions. College level reading is strongly recommended for success in the course.

ANTH 222
Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
3 Units (AA/AS; Citrus D2; CSU; UC; IGETC 4A; CSUGE D1)
54 lecture hours

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ENGL 101.

This introductory course serves as a foundation for understanding language from an anthropological perspective, addressing such core questions as how, what, when, where, why and with whom we communicate. This course surveys three core areas in linguistic anthropology--structural linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology and syntax, as well as the biocultural basis of language; historical linguistics: origins and evolution/change, dialects, and language families; and sociocultural linguistics: language acquisition in cultural context, emphasizing the relationship between language and culture, and issues of language conservation and loss.

ANTH 224
Anthropology of Religion, Magic, and Witchcraft
3 Units (AA/AS; Citrus D2; CSU; UC; IGETC 4A; CSUGE D1)
54 lecture hours

Grade Mode: Pass/No Pass, Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ENGL 101.

This introductory course examines the forms and functions of religion cross-culturally and the manner in which anthropology investigates religious beliefs and practices. Applying cultural relativism to the study of topics such as mythology, supernatural beings, souls and ghosts, magic, witchcraft, and altered states of consciousness is emphasized. Connections between religious life and general patterns of human behavior are explored, including the role of ritual in social life, the use of specialists, and processes of cultural change.